COMPANION

String playing

Articles

  • ‘Body Mapping for string players’ by John Crawford contains examples of body mapping for violin/viola players.[1]
  • ‘Looking at the double bass’ by Peter Buckoke; observations on playing the double bass, including bow grip, left arm, left hand fingers, bowing, playing near the bridge.[2]
  • ‘String playing and the Technique’ by Elisabeth Waterhouse; reminiscences of learning the violin, and observations on various people during the workshop playing.[3]
  • ‘String playing, pain and the Alexander Technique’ by Kathryn Zimmerman examines three case histories: a violinist, a viola player, and a bass player.[4]
  • ‘Violinist in balance’ by Crissman Taylor reports on a research project into using custom wedge-shaped rubber shoulder rest and customised chin rest in combination with having lessons in the Technique.[5]
  • ‘Violinist in balance’ by Gilles Rullmann on using the dual approach of the Technique and providing customised equipment (chin rest, shoulder rest) for violin and viola players.[6]
  • ‘The physicality of string playing’ by Alun Thomas; on a number of games and explorations – balance games, exploring gravity, exploring the connections between the arms and the back – for physical and psychological development of string playing.[7]

Thesis

  • ‘The Alexander Technique and the pedagogy of Paul Rolland’ by Carol P. McCullough. Paul Rolland (1911-78) developed a ‘whole body’ approach to violing technique and later in life incorporated aspects of the Alexander Technique in his string pedagogy.[8]

Case histories

  • ‘1st Year Degree’ by Anna Cashell; extracts from a 1st year student’s (violinist) Alexander diary.[9]
  • ‘Spontaneity in the performance of music’ by Kate Robinson; a level 2 essay by a 3rd year violin student at RCM.[10]

See also Cello.

References

[1] ‘Body Mapping for string players’ by John Crawford in Papers from the 3rd International Music Conference 1998 edited by Judith Kleinman (Peter Buckoke, 1999), pp. 24–27.
[2] ‘Looking at the double bass’ by Peter Buckoke in Papers from the 3rd International Music Conference 1998 edited by Judith Kleinman (Peter Buckoke, 1999), pp. 19–22.
[3] ‘String playing and the Technique’ by Elisabeth Waterhouse in Papers from the 4th International Music Conference 2000 edited by Peter Buckoke (Peter Buckoke, 2000), pp. 35–40.
[4] ‘String playing, pain and the Alexander Technique’ by Kathryn Zimmerman in The Alexander Journal no. 22 edited by Francesca Greenoak (STAT, 2008), pp. 34–36.
[5] ‘Violinist in balance’ by Crissman Taylor in The Congress Papers 2011, Learning from Each Other edited by Siriol Jones, (STAT Books, 2012), pp. 374–80.
[6] ‘Violinist in balance’ by Gilles Rullmann in The Congress Papers 2018, Advancing Global Perspectives edited by Paul Marsh (STAT Books, 2019), pp. 198–205.
[7] ‘The physicality of string playing’ by Alun Thomas in The Congress Papers 2015, Empowering Humanity, Inspiring Science edited by Rachel Gering-Hasthorpe (STAT Books, 2016), pp. 169–73.
[8] ‘The Alexander Technique and the pedagogy of Paul Rolland’ by Carol P. McCullough (author, 1996).
[9] ‘1st Year Degree’ by Anna Cashell in Papers from the 4th International Music Conference 2000 edited by Peter Buckoke (Peter Buckoke, 2000), pp. 8–10.
[10] ‘Spontaneity in the performance of music’ by Kate Robinson in Papers from the 4th International Music Conference 2000 edited by Peter Buckoke (Peter Buckoke, 2000), pp. 11–15.
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