COMPANION

Cello

Books

  • Just Play Naturally by Vivien Mackie and Joe Armstrong. An account of studying with Pablo Casals in the 1950s and the similarity with the principles of the Alexander Technique.[1]
  • Cello, Bow and You by Evangeline Benedetti.[2]

Articles

  • ‘Applying chairwork to cello playing’ by Eckhart Richter lists nine typical misuses among cellists and suggestions for addressing these.[3]
  • ‘Butterfly Soup’ by Vivien Mackie; on receptivity, to ‘surrender’ after all the rehearsal, in performance.[4]
  • ‘The physicality of string playing’ by Alun Thomas; on a number of games and explorations – balance games, exploring gravity, exploring the connections between the arms and the back – for physical and psychological development of string playing.[5]

Research

  • ‘Bowstroke analysis of professional cellists’ by W. Kenton Bales; on a pilot study involving three cellists from the Omaha Symphony Association, being filmed on high-speed film before and after a 20-minute lesson in the Alexander Technique, showing a change of velocity (which is a rough indicator of how smoothly the bow was pulled across the string).[6]

See also String playing.

References

[1] Just Play Naturally by Vivien Mackie and Joe Armstrong (Duende Editions, 2002).
[2] Cello, Bow and You by Evangeline Benedetti (Oxford University Press, 2016).
[3] ‘Applying chairwork to cello playing’ by Eckhart Richter in The Congress Papers 1988: Towards Unity edited by Jeremy Chance (Direction, 1994), pp. 112–23.
[4] ‘Butterfly Soup’ by Vivien Mackie in Direction vol. 1, no. 8 edited by Jeremy Chance (Fyncot Pty Ltd., 1991), pp. 306–07.
[5] ‘The physicality of string playing’ by Alun Thomas in The Congress Papers 2015, Empowering Humanity, Inspiring Science edited by Rachel Gering-Hasthorpe (STAT Books, 2016), pp. 169–73.
[6] ‘Bowstroke analysis of professional cellists’ by W. Kenton Bales in The Alexander Review vol. 3, no. 3 (Centerline Press, Winter 1988), pp. 51–56.
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