COMPANION

Pupils of F. M. Alexander

Raymond Dart, John Dewey, Aldous Huxley

James Harvey Robinson (1863–1936), U. S. historian and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Robinson specialised in European history about which he wrote several works. He obtained his Ph.D. at Freiburg in 1890, and was Professor of History at Columbia University 1895–1919 and a founding member of the New School for Social Research in New York where he lectured (1919–21). His best known works were An Introduction to the History of Western Europe (1902) which went through several editions, and The Mind in the Making (1921) which argues for the necessity of free thought if...
Jennette Barbour Perry Lee (1861? 67?–1951), teacher, author and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Jennette Barbour Perry Lee studied at Smith College 1883–86 after which she taught Philosophy, Rhetoric and Composition at the Grant Collegiate Institute in Chicago. Later she taught at the Wheaton Academy, Vassar, and Western Reserve. In 1886, she married Gerald Stanley Lee. In 1901, she returned to Smith as an instructor, and in 1904 was officially appointed as an Associate Professor in English. She taught popular courses in Appreciation and Criticism until 1913.[1]...
John Dewey (1859–1952), American philosopher of education and pupil and supporter of F. M. Alexander. Life John Dewey studied at the University of Vermont and at Johns Hopkins University. After two years as a high-school teacher he decided he was unsuited for teaching in primary or secondary education. He received his Ph.D. School of Arts & Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. It was while he was teaching at the University of Chicago (1894–99) that he started writing and formulating his pedagogical beliefs. From 1904 until his retirement in 1930 he was professor of...
John Duncan Dunn (1872–1951?), British golfer, golf course designer and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Duncan Dunn was a nephew of William Dunn, Jr. (1864–1952), who was also a well-known golfer and designer of golf courses in the US. Duncan Dunn sold his own design of clubs and was a golf course architect.[1] He wrote several books, including A. B. C. of Golf. In his article ‘Conscious control and the lofting shot’ (in 1920 in the The Golfer’s Magazine) he wrote that MSI would be one of the best books for the ‘beginning golfer and the older player...
John Hilton (1880–1942), English journalist, lecturer, sociologist, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Hilton started as an apprentice mechanic, but soon became works manager and later the manager at a firm of loom makers. When he was 28 a severe sciatica attack forced him to give up work. He started contributing articles to newspapers and became a speaker for the Free Trade Union and the Norman Angell Movement for preventing war. This work made him train his voice carefully. To combat bouts of depression, he took up deep breathing. A 1918 study of trade organizations led him to...
Joseph Rowntree (1836–1925), English cocoa and confectionery manufacturer and philanthropist. A pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Joseph Rowntree and his brother, Henry Isaac, acquired a small cocoa manufacturing business in York in 1862, and Joseph Rowntree became the sole owner in 1883. At Rowntree’s retirement in 1923, the factory employed 7,000 people under working conditions well in advance of their time. Rowntree came from a Quaker family. He was a social and industrial reformer who was concerned with the welfare of his workers. His company was one of the first in England...
Lawrence (Larry) Kelso Frank (1890–1968), US educator and child-development expert, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Frank received a B.A. in economics in 1912 and worked as a systems analyst. In 1923 he became an executive for the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial foundation. He also worked for the General Education Board and the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, where he was vice-president 1936-1942. Through foundation work he supported and developed the field of child development. He was in the forefront of the movement in the 1920s and 1930s to set up child-study institutes...
Leonard Sidney Woolf (1880–1969), man of letters, political worker, author, publisher, husband of author Virginia Woolf, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Woolf worked in the Ceylon Civil Service (1904-11). He resigned in 1912 and married Virginia Stephen the same year. He turned to writing and published his first novel in 1913. He joined the Labour Party and the Fabian Society. Throughout his life he wrote articles for several journals, and was editor of The Political Quarterly (1931-59). In 1917 with his wife he founded the Hogarth Press, which published his own tracts as...
Lily Brayton (1876–1953), British actress and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Lily Brayton made her first appearance in 1896 and became famous for her performance in the rôle of Viola in Twelfth Night in 1901 and as Yo-San in The Darling of the Gods in 1903 or 1904. In 1898 she married the actor Oscar Asche (1871–1936) with whom she entered the management of His Majesty’s Theatre in 1916. They performed mainly in London but also toured Australia (1909–10) and South Africa (1913–14). She retired from acting in 1932.[1] [2] [3] In an advertisement...
Victor Alexander G. R. Bulwer-Lytton, 2nd Earl of Lytton (1876 –1947), was a British politician and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Lytton worked in the Admiralty 1916–20, before being appointed Under-Secretary of State for India 1920–22. He was Governor of Bengal 1922–27 and in 1926 served briefly as Viceroy (a post his father had held as well). He chaired the Lytton Commission, which was sent by the League of Nations on a fact-finding mission to determine who was to blame in the 1931 war between Japan and China in Manchuria. The commission’s report, officially issued on...
Margaret Naumburg (1890–1983), US educator, author and founder of dynamically oriented art therapy, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life While a student at Barnard College, Naumburg shared rooms with Evelyn Dewey (daughter of John Dewey). Naumburg studied with John Dewey at Columbia University and did further studies at the London School of Economics and Oxford. She studied the Montessori Method with Maria Montessori in Rome in 1913. Here she met Irene Tasker and Ethel Webb. In 1914 Naumburg opened the Children’s School which was later renamed the Walden...
Marie Ney (neé Fix) (1895–1981) was an English actress and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life As a young child, Ney went with her family to live in New Zealand. She began her acting career in that country, and continued it in Australia. After several years she moved back to Britain, where she acted at the Old Vic with many famous actors of the day such as Robert Donat (who was also a pupil of Alexander). She went on to appear in many films, from 1919 to 1964, and then in television until 1969.[1] Connection with Alexander In notes for an unpublished memoirs Marie Ney...
Mary Louisa Beatrice Olcott (1864–1962), US suffragette, world traveller and author,[1] and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Mary Olcott was born in Brooklyn, New York. She received her education at private schools and under the guidance of tutors. She was of a colonial family which had settled in the US in the 17th century. She wrote a genealogical history of her family, tracing it back to 16th century England. In 1902 she published a book of poems,[2] and she also wrote articles on gardening. She was a member of more than 20 associations, societies and clubs, mainly historical and...
Lucy Mary Silcox (1862–1947), teacher and headmistress, and pupil of F. M. Alexander Life Silcox took an M.A. in London and the Classical Tripos at Newnham College, Cambridge. She was Headmistress of East Liverpool High School in 1901 and of Dulwich High School from 1901 to 1908. In 1909 she became Headmistress of St. Felix School, Southwold, a girls’ boarding school founded in 1897. She oversaw the construction of several new buildings and the purchase of many acres of land for playing fields and buildings. Her time at St. Felix has been described as a golden age for the...
Matheson Lang (1879–1948) was a British actor, actor-manager and playwright, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Matheson Lang began his career in 1897, and first played in London in 1900. He became well-known for his Shakespearen roles, playing Othello, Hamlet and Romeo, among others. He worked with Sir Frank Benson, Lillie Langtry, Ellen Terry, Oscar Asche (also a pupil of Alexander) and Nora Kerin (also a pupil of Alexander). He performed as Romeo with Nora Kerin as Juliet in 1908. Between 1910 and 1913 Lang and his wife (the actress Nelly Hutin Britton) formed their own...
Maurice Baring (1874–1945), dramatist, poet, novelist, essayist, travel writer and war correspondent. He was a pupil of Alexander. Life He started out as a diplomat, serving in Paris, Copenhagen and Rome, but he resigned from the Foreign Office to cover the Russo-Japanese war for the Morning Post in 1904. At the start of World War I he joined the Royal Flying Corps, and later served in the Royal Air Force. He received an OBE in 1918. In the 1920s he enjoyed success as a dramatist and novelist. He was a prolific and popular author and wrote over fifty books, countless articles and...
Maurice Burton (1898 –1992), a British zoologist and popular science author, and a pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Maurice Burton read Zoology at London University. He worked at the British Museum of Natural History from 1927 to 1958. He was the Science Editor for the Illustrated London News and Nature Correspondent for the Daily Telegraph. He wrote some twenty natural history books, and contributed to several natural history encyclopedias, especially for children.[1] Connection with F. M. Alexander The following is an extract from a letter from Maurice Burton to ‘Nikko...
Dr Mungo Douglas, Scottish doctor, who was an ardent supporter of Alexander and the Technique. Life He became a doctor in 1921 and practised in Bolton for most of his life. He became a pupil of Alexander’s in about 1928 or 1929. His wife, Sydney, also had lessons and they became friends of Alexander’s.[1] Writings Douglas wrote more than 17 letters in support of the Technique - published mainly in medical journals - and two published articles: ‘Re-Orientation of the View Point Upon the Study of Anatomy’ and ‘A Unique Example of Operational...
Philip Boswood Ballard (1865–1950), Scottish headmaster, author and Inspector of Schools, and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Philip Boswood Ballard (1865–1950), British Inspector of Schools, Doctor of Literature and author. Boswood was Headmaster of Pupil Teachers’ School, Tondu, Glamorgan, 1898–1903, before he became an Inspector of Schools: in Glamorgan 1903–05, and then with the London County Council 1906–30. He was twice president of the Association of Inspectors and Educational Organizers, was a member of the Child Guidance Council, and president...
Percy Hugh Boomer (1885-1949), golfer and pupil of F. M. Alexander. Life Percy Boomer and his brother Aubrey Boomer (b.1897) were professional British golfers and won several championships in the 1920s. According to Wikipedia: ‘Boomer was one of the top teachers of golf in Europe and spent the majority of his professional career at St. Cloud Country Club in the Paris suburbs. He was a proponent of muscle memory in the golf swing and reminded his students to block out negative thoughts in favor of more positive ones in order to play better golf.’ Writings Percy Boomer...

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