COMPANION

Psychology & Emotions

Psychotherapies, Fear, Emotions

A construct here refers to the image we construct of ourselves, our sense of self; and includes both mental and physical constructs. It includes similar terms such as self-image, postural model, body memory, body image, body-concept, body percept, body schema, and body map. F. M. Alexander Terms such as ‘construct’, ‘postural model’, ‘body image’ were not used by Alexander (these terms probably did not exist at the time of Alexander developing his technique). He referred to ‘sensory appreciation’, ‘concepts’ and ‘beliefs...
F. M. Alexander On being asked whether Alexander dealt directly with people’s emotional and psychological problems in the context of the training course, Walter Carrington answered: ‘The answer is: no, he definitely did not. He didn’t deal with them at all. I rather think he walked away from it. It was something he didn’t want to recognise or know anything about.’[1] [For more details see Personally Speaking.[2]] ‘Alexander and emotion’ by Walter Carrington contains recollections of Alexander’s attitude to emotions, in himself and in other...
F. M. Alexander Alexander wrote on the subject of fear in several of his books, often using the term ‘fear reflexes’, but also referring to ‘nerves’, discouragement, worry, fright (including stage fright), and anxiety. The most detailed description is Chapter VI in CCC which is titled ‘Unduly Excited Fear Reflexes, Uncontrolled Emotions, and Fixed Prejudices’.[1] Generally Alexander made three points: 1) that fear is often associated with fear of the unknown (and that this is an instinctual reaction and the origin of superstition), and 2) that fear...
As F. M. Alexander maintained that the human organism is a psycho-physical whole, he did not specifically address psychology separate from the use of the self or what generally today is described as mental health issues. However, later (from the 1980s onwards) some teachers of the Technique have argued that teachers should have some knowledge of psychology or psychotherapy in order to better deal with emotional and mental issues arising from teaching. For individual psychotherapies (and for Alexander criticism of psycho-analysis), see Psychotherapies. Surveys ‘The Alexander...
F. M. Alexander on Freudian psycho-analysis In CCC, in the section ‘Need for Substituting in all Spheres the Principle of Prevention on a General Basis for Methods of “Cure” on a Specific Basis’, Alexander criticises psycho-analysis: Another form of treatment to which I should like to draw attention in this connection is psycho-analysis. This method has enjoyed a certain publicity in recent years, but in spite of the ‘cures’ which are claimed for it, I am prepared to demonstrate that it is based on the same specific ‘end-gaining’...