COMPANION

Institutions

The Alexander Technique Affiliated Societies (ATAS) consists at present of 18 national societies of teachers of the Alexander Technique. They recognise each others’ professional qualifications and agree to maintain the same standards for the training and professional conduct of Alexander Technique teachers worldwide. (AMMAS is a sister-organisation to ATAS, see below). Meetings of societies for the formation of ATAS started in the 1990s. Articles and reports on ATAS ‘Report of meeing in Sydney’ (no author).[1] ‘International liason’ by Dorothea...
There are three archives dedicated to Alexander Technique material. STAT Archives STAT maintains an archive of material on the Alexander Technique and related subjects. Website: http://www.statarchives.org.uk/ Frank Pierce Jones Archives the Dimon Institute houses the Frank Pierce Jones Archives, which contains the complete archive of Jones’ collection on the Alexander Technique. Website: https://dimoninstitute.org/ The Walter Carrington Educational Trust Walter Carrington’s large collection of papers and books, with additional material, is now housed...
16, Ashley Place, London SW1, was F. M. Alexander’s home and teaching practice from 1911 until his death in 1955. History F. M. Alexander first lived in 1, Army and Navy Mansions, 109 Victoria Street, between his arrival in London in 1904 and 1911. He would have moved to Ashley Place in 1911.[1] After he purchased the country house Penhill in 1924, he would generally stay at Penhill at weekends and holidays. Some time in the 1940s, possibly after his stroke in December 1947, he would stay at Evelyn Mansions, where Margaret Goldie had a flat and provided him with a bedroom. The...
STAT (since 1960) and AmSAT (since 1993) have held annual F. Matthias Alexander Memorial Lectures. Below is a list of the lectures where known. In STAT’s early days there were no STAT newsletters (it first appeared in 1983) and the Alexander Journal was published irregularly, meaning that for a number of years it is not known who gave the lecture (or indeed if a lecture was given). STAT’s F. Matthias Alexander Memorial Lectures 1960: ‘Physiological gradients’ by A. Rugg-Gunn (1960?, no date, but the author says it is the first Memorial Lecture).[1] 1961:...
Penhill House was F. M. Alexander’s second home 1925–55 and also housed the Little School 1934–40. History Penhill House was located near Sidcup, Bexley, Bexleyheath, Kent. It was originally part of the Lamorbey Estate (Lamorbey House still exists and now houses Rose Bruford college[1]). The Estate had been divided up in 1761, and one part comprised Penhill House, a cottage, stables with adjacent gardens and outbuildings. By the time Alexander bought it in 1925 it consisted of 19 acres of farm land. The house had two drawing rooms, a smoking room, a lobby hall and a...
The Alexander Foundation School was a small private boarding school, running from c. 1947 to the late 1950s or early 1960s in Pennsylvania. History Esther Duke, a pupil of A. R. Alexander, was affiliated with a Quaker school, the Media Friends School, in Pennsylvania. Some time around 1943 she arranged for Irene Stewart and Margaret Goldie to teach at the school. When F. M. Alexander returned to London in 1943, A. R. Alexander and some of the trainees on the Alexander brother’s teacher training course, moved to Swarthmore and Media. When A. R. Alexander suffered a stroke around...
The Charity was formed in 1996 and is working under the name of Friends of the Alexander Technique (AT Friends). It runs community events for teachers, pupils and members of the public such as lectures, concerts, workshops and social events. Trustees: Eileen Armstrong, Margaret Edis, Sue Fleming, Brita Forsstrom, John Hunter, Glynn MacDonald, Dorothea Magonet (Treasurer), Jamie McDowell, Kamal Thapen (Chair), Philip Tucker, Malcolm Williamson. The Charity for the F. Matthias Alexander Technique is a company limited by guarantee and registered in England and Wales No. 3153329,...
The Charity was formed in 1991 in order to advance the education of the general public in the Alexander Technique and to promote research and study into all aspects of the Technique. Its working name is The Alexander Trust. It supports mainly research into and publications (books, videos) on the Alexander Technique. Introductory and promotional articles ‘The F. Matthias Alexander Trust: Supporting the Technique’.[1] ‘Supporting the Technique’.[2] ‘The Alexander Trust appeal’ by David Clark reports on the appeal which had received £2...
The International Congresses started in 1986 for the purpose of providing a forum for the exchange of knowledge and experience on the Alexander Technique, and are open to anyone interested in the Technique. They are typically attended by between 300 and 700 participants. The International Congresses were first run by Michael and Lena Frederick, later by independent Congress Directors by invitation of Michael Frederick, and are now run by Congress Directors, who are selected and supervised by the Alexander Technique Congress Association (ATCA, registered in Geneva, Switzerland). The...
The Little School was the first school for children based on the principles of the Alexander Technique. It was started in London (at Ashley Place) in 1924 by Irene Tasker who ran it until 1934. It was called the ‘little school’ and this epithet has been used ever since, even after it acquired an official name, ‘The F. Matthias Alexander Trust Fund School’, at the time it moved to Penhill House in April 1934. Penhill House was Alexander’s 23-acre residence  in Bexleyheath, Kent, which could provide for boarders. The official name came about because The F....
The Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique (STAT) was founded in the UK in 1958 or 1959 by Dr Wilfred Barlow, Marjory Barlow and Joyce Warwick. Membership The table below show membership numbers in the years 1981–87.[1] Year 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 U.K. 136 155 165 188 220 261 300 Overseas...
The charity was formed in 2010 in order to continue the work of the Constructive Teaching Centre on a charitable basis. The main activities are: teaching the Alexander Technique in a manner consistent with the training programme developed by Walter Carrington at the Constructive Teaching Centre in Holland Park, London, both to new students and to qualified teachers who wish to continue their professional development; maintaining and promoting the archives on the Alexander Technique currently held by the Constructive Teaching Centre; delivering free informal workshops for teachers of...
The Whitney Homestead, Massachusetts, USA, was home to Alexander and the Little School 1941-1942. The Whitney Homestead is situated at 485 Great Road, in Stow, Massachusetts. It was built 1843–44 by the Whitney family. The last Whitney died in 1928, and the building, 129 acres of farmland, and $125,000 were bequeathed to the American Unitarian Association for the creation of a rest home for ministers and laymen. The rest home was not profitable and had closed before Alexander’s arrival. With the assistance of D. Robert Dexter the building was let, rent-free, to Alexander and...