COMPANION

F. M. Alexander's Writings

Criticism of Alexander’s writings

Alexander’s books have been attacked for their style, for being incomprehensible, for being wordy, for their terminology, mostly, but not exclusively, by reviewers who have not experienced the Technique. In addition his evolutionary philosophy, his racism, and his (lack of) science has been criticised. Wilfred Barlow,[1] Walter Carrington,[2] Irene Tasker,[3] Catherine Kettrick[4] and Elizabeth Langford[5] have written in defence of Alexander’s writings, predominantly along the lines that Alexander’s books are technical writings, and the difficulty of introducing a...
Articles, lectures and published letters The 1995 compilation, Articles & Lectures, contains 16 articles and letters written before Alexander’s first book, Man’s Supreme Inheritance (1910); six letters published between 1924 and 1948; three lectures (of which two are reported almost verbatim) given between 1925 and 1949; teaching aphorisms – observations and instructions from lessons; a foreword and a chapter for an unfinished book, ‘Alexander and the Doctors’; and an autobiographical sketch covering Alexander’s first 35 years.[1] Man’s...
‘Herd instinct’ is an early phrasing of what is now referred to as herd behaviour, group behaviour or crowd psychology. The idea is based on the observation that humans (and some animals) behave differently in large groups than they do individually, and that in groups they can act collectively without a leader or from centralised instructions. The idea has been used to study aspects of human behaviour such as imitation, emulation, mob violence, and aspects of socialising. It has also been used to explain phenomenons such as brand and product success, the behaviour of large...