COMPANION

F. M. Alexander

Descriptions of Alexander

This section only covers criticisms of Alexander’s character, his personality traits. For other criticisms see below. Criticism of Personality Leonard Wolff wrote in his diary that ‘he [Alexander] was a quack but an honest and inspired quack.’[1] Ludovici in his Religions for Infidels (1961) reported on his first impression of Alexander: Altogether, I thought him too reminiscent of a showman, and there and then decided to have nothing to do with him.[2] Neal Katz asserted that Alexander was a compulsive gambler: ‘F. M. Alexander was a brilliant genius...
Several first-generation teachers wrote and spoke about F. M. Alexander, in particular Lulie Westfeldt, Erika Whittaker, Marjory Barlow,[1] [2] Walter Carrington, F. P. Jones and Elisabeth Walker. See individual biography for details of their writings. Descriptions of F. M. Alexander frequently contain a mixture of descriptions of Alexander’s character and his teaching. Descriptions of Alexander – Books F. Matthias Alexander: The Man and His Work by Lulie Westfeldt contains descriptions of lessons and the teachers training course.[3] The Expanding Self by Goddard...
Life Frederick Matthias Alexander was born in Tasmania in 1869. He started to evolve his technique in the early 1890s. It was initially developed to solve the frequent loss of voice he suffered working as a reciter. A successful reciter and teacher of elocution he toured Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand. He first taught the Technique as applied to elocution, but he gradually discovered how applicable it is to all activities of living and how fundamental a contribution to health and well-being it makes. He settled first in Melbourne, and later in Sydney where he advertised his Operatic...
Influences on early writings The First 43 Years of the Life of F. Matthias Alexander, volumes 1–2, by Jeroen Staring (1996) covers predominantly possible influences on Alexander and his technique until 1912 by comparing Alexander’s writings with contemporary people’s writings.[1] Influence on voice and breathing In his 1894–95 writings F. M. Alexander mentions or quotes from the following voice and breathing authors: Lennox Browne and Emile Behnke (authors of Voice Song and Speech, 1883, and others).[2] Andrew Comstock (author of A System of Elocution...