COMPANION

Bodywork

Feldenkrais, Pilates, Yoga

Carl Stough (1926–2000) developed a way of approaching breathing which has similarities with the Alexander Technique. His method is used by some Alexander Technique teachers. Jessica Wolf, a teacher of the Technique, developed a teaching based on Stough’s method called ‘The Art of Breathing’. Writings and video ‘Misconceptions about breathing’ by Jessica Wolf.[1] ‘Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing’ by Jessica Wolf.[2] Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing: Rib animation [DVD].[3] References [1] ‘...
Fascial Unwinding (FU) is a therapy through which physical and emotional blocks can be released. ‘An introduction to fascial unwinding’ by Mika Hadar-Borthwick; the author has worked with Fascial Unwinding often in conjunction with the Alexander Technique.[1] ‘Fascia release: Unlocking the psychophysical library’ by Mika Hadar-Borthwick presents a seven step guide to fascia release which she regards as a complementary therapeutic tool to the Alexander Technique.[2] References [1] ‘An introduction to fascial unwinding’ by Mika Hadar-...
The Feldenkrais Method is a type of exercise therapy devised by Moshé Feldenkrais (1904–1984). Feldenkrais and F. M. Alexander Moshe Feldenkrais had lessons in the Alexander Technique with Walter Carrington in the 1940s. When Feldenkrais’ book, Body and Mature Behaviour, came out in 1949, F. M. Alexander was alerted to it, and upon reading it, realised that many ideas were based, unacknowledged, on Alexander’s books and work. Alexander had a brief conversation with Feldenkrais about it, and decided that Feldenkrais could have no more lessons.[1] For more details...
Laban movement analysis is a method and language for describing, visualising, interpreting and documenting movement. It is based on the work of Rudolf Laban (1879–1958), and developed and extended by Irmgard Bartenieff (1900–1981) and others. ‘Body-mind therapies – A sensory based comparison of systems’ by Aileen Crow reports on a meeting September 1985 of seven Alexander Technique teachers, some of whom are trained in Laban Movement Analysis.[1] References [1] ‘Body-mind therapies – A sensory based comparison of systems’ by...
Françoise Mézières (1909–91) was a French physiotherapist who developed her own method, which posthumously has been named ‘Postural Reconstruction’. ‘The use and abuse of anatomy’ by Joel Carbonel, a teacher of the Alexander Technique, argues, like Mézières, that back musculature is too strong and shortened, and therefore it goes against the conclusions of Dr David Garlick’s observations. (In the same issue David Gorman replies.)[1] References [1] ‘The use and abuse of anatomy’ by Joel...
Joseph Pilates (1880–1967) developed a system of exercises which puts emphasis on alignment, breathing, and developing a strong core, and improving balance. Pilates called his method ‘Contrology’ but it is today known as ‘Pilates’. Writings – Books The Mind Body Workout – With Pilates and The Alexander Technique by Lynne Robinson and Helge Fisher.[1] Writings – Articles ‘Teaching a Pilates mat class with an Alexander agenda’ by Diane Young Sussman introduces Pilates and how the Alexander Technique can inform...
History of Alexander Technique and yoga The first yoga teachers to train in the Alexander Technique in the UK were Ken Thompson (starting April 1976), Chris Stevens and Ray Evans (starting September 1976).[1] Writings – Books Yoga and the Alexander Technique by David Moore.[2] Smart Yoga, by David Moore.[3] Yoga and the Alexander Technique by Karyn Chapman, Kate Morris.[4] Yoga (Know the Game) by Chris Stevens, mentions the Alexander Technique and advocates the semi-supine.[5] Are you a Natural Hatha Yogi by Ken Thompson does not mention the Alexander Technique but...