COMPANION

Arts - Other

Stage fright

Articles ‘Seeds of imagination: Developing creativity in teaching the Alexander Technique’ by Cathy Madden covers her four levels of AT-facilitated exercises for creativity; 1. retraining basic image-making skills; 2. responding to imagined stimuli; 3. linking images to each other; 4. communicating the imagined world. And on dimensional learning.[1] ‘Creativity in motion’ by Korina Biggs describes a workshop where people were first exploring fluidity in movement, and then either writing or drawing in order to allow non-habitual ways of expression to emerge from...
Articles ‘Art and the fearless brain’ by Joseph Sanders proposes a seven-fold ‘performance-centred learning’ model in order to move away from fear-inducing concentrative models.[1] ‘The vitality and grace of the performing artist’ by Nadia Alexandra Kevan; observations on teaching freedom of movement for performers, with reference to the psycho-physical support system and the body awareness course she taught for 20 years at the Folkwang University of Arts, Essen.[2] ‘Reflective practice, the Alexander Technique and technology’ by...
This entry also includes performance anxiety. F. M. Alexander There are two references to stage fright by Alexander, both referring to him putting on Hamlet and The Merchant of Venice in Sydney with pupils who had never performed before. In his 1925 lecture he related this story: On the opening night, a very eminent man was stage-managing for me. He rushed into my room five minutes before the curtain, and said, ‘Alexander, I hear these young people have never appeared in public before.’ I said, ‘That is true.’ He said, ‘You are mad.’ I...
Articles ‘“It’s too serious to be serious about”: Using stories to introduce the Alexander Technique’ by Sandra Niman and Dorothy Ormes; on using stories as an alternative way of introducing otherwise difficult principles of the Technique.[1] ‘Inhibition applied to storytelling’ by Glenn Swift describes the exercises used in preparation for storytelling at the author’s workshop.[2] ‘Embodied stage presence’ by Corinne Cassini; on using storytelling and ‘kinaesthetical listening’ to create a more spontaneous...