COMPANION

Teaching aids

This entry covers methods which involve some kind of equipment and other aids used in teaching and learning the Technique. This entry excludes table and chair which are listed under Classical procedures. The use of a wall, a staircase, books and other readily available aids are not included.

Anatomical aids

See The use of anatomy and physiology.

Balance board, wobble board

Some training courses and teachers are using balance boards, but there are no written descriptions.

Gym ball

See Exercise ball.

Juggling balls

See Juggling.

Mirrors

See Use of mirrors.

Saddle and wooden horse

See Saddle work.

Self-portraits

  • ‘“How will I know that I have changed?” – Changes in self-perception: The use of self-portraits in academic courses on the Alexander Technique’ by Pamela Payne Lewis; on using before and after self-portraits as part of teaching the Technique twelve times on music courses, including having students writing reflections on the difference between their own portraits.[1]

Stories, storytelling

  • ‘“It’s too serious to be serious about”: Using stories to introduce the Alexander Technique’ by Sandra Niman and Dorothy Ormes; on using stories as an alternative way of introducing otherwise difficult principles of the Technique.[2]

See also Storytelling.

Video

  • ‘The Alexander Technique and the TV/video media’ by Eugene Schlusser on the pros and cons of using video and what equipment to use.[3]

Writing

See Writing.

See also Use of mirrors, The use of anatomy and physiology.

References

[1] ‘“How will I know that I have changed?” – Changes in self-perception: The use of self-portraits in academic courses on the Alexander Technique’ by Pamela Payne Lewis in The Congress Papers 1996, Back to Basics edited by Shmuel Nelken (Shmuel Nelken, 1999), pp. 157–76.
[2] ‘“It’s too serious to be serious about”: Using stories to introduce the Alexander Technique’ by Sandra Niman and Dorothy Ormes in The Congress Papers 1996, Back to Basics edited by Shmuel Nelken (Shmuel Nelken, 1999), pp. 196–97.
[3] ‘The Alexander Technique and the TV/video media’ by Eugene Schlusser in The Congress Papers 1994, The Meaning of Change, 125 Years On, edited by David Garlick (Direction, 1996), pp. 111–13.