COMPANION

Repetitive strain injury

Repetitive strain injury (RSI) and associative trauma disorders, also known as work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs), are umbrella terms used to refer to several conditions that often are associated with repetitive tasks, forceful exertions, vibrations, mechanical compression, or sustained/awkward positions.[1]

Books

  • Working Without Pain – Eliminate repetitive strain injuries with Alexander Technique by Sherry Berjeron-Oliver and Bruce Oliver.[2]

Articles

  • ‘Information for Alexander teachers with pupils suffering from “diffuse RSI”’ by Hellie Mulvaney reports that her recovery from diffuse RSI was greatly assisted by learning the Technique.[3]
  • ‘RSI awareness day’ by Claire Rennie reports on 12 teachers of the Technique taking part in the 2008 RSI Conference and Awareness Day.[4]
  • ‘Alexander Technique success stories: Mike Klodginski’ by Clare Maxwell on what is most likely a carpal tunnel syndrome case.[5]

Research

‘Effects of the Alexander Technique on muscle activation during a computer mouse task’ by Elyse Shafarman and Mark W. Geisler is a summary of the research involving 32 adults of whom 16 had years of experience of the Technique; participants with Alexander Technique experience showed significantly lower levels of muscle activation in the forearm.[6]

See also Ergonomics, Handwriting, The Alexandere Technique in the workplace.

References

[2] Working Without Pain – Eliminate repetitive strain injuries with Alexander Technique by Sherry Berjeron-Oliver and Bruce Oliver (Pacific Institute for the Alexander Technique, 1997).
[3] ‘Information for Alexander teachers with pupils suffering from “diffuse RSI”’ by Hellie Mulvaney in STATNews vol. 6, no. 6 edited by Ann James (STAT, January 2002), pp. 16–17.
[4] ‘RSI awareness day’ by Claire Rennie in STATNews vol. 6, no. 25 edited by Ann James (STAT, May 2008), p. 19.
[5] ‘Alexander Technique success stories: Mike Klodginski’ by Clare Maxwell in AmSAT Journal issue no. 1 (Spring 2012), p. 43.
[6] ‘Effects of the Alexander Technique on muscle activiation during a computer mouse task’ by Elyse Shafarman and Mark W. Geisler in AmSAT News issue no. 71 (Summer 2006), p. 15. Also in The Alexander Journal no. 21 edited by Francsca Greenoak (STAT, 2006), pp. 53–66.