COMPANION

Rajal Cohen’s research

Research papers by Rajal Cohen

‘Neck posture is influenced by anticipation of stepping’ by Rajal G. Cohen, et al.

Habitual head forward posture was measured in 45 young adults standing quietly and when they anticipated walking to place a tray: also in conditions requiring that they bend low or balance an object on the tray. The neck angle relative to torso increased when participants anticipated movement, particularly for more difficult movements. Inhibitory control was measured using a Go/No-Go task, Stroop task, and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale. False alarms on the Go/No-Go task correlated with a more extended head relative to the neck and with shortening of the neck when anticipating movement. It was concluded that maintaining neutral posture may require inhibition of an impulse to put the head forward of the body when anticipating target-directed movement.[1]

‘Preliminary evidence for feasibility, efficacy, and mechanisms of Alexander Technique group classes for chronic neck pain’ by Rajal G. Cohen, et al.

Ten participants who were predominately middle-aged and had experienced neck pain for at least six months, attended ten one-hour group classes in AT over five weeks. After the intervention: 1) participants reported significantly reduced neck pain; 2) fatigue of the superficial neck flexors during the cranio-cervical flexion test was substantially lower; 3) posture was marginally more upright, as compared to the second pre-intervention values. Changes in pain, self-efficacy, and neck muscle fatigue were retained at the second post-test and tended to be correlated with one another.[2]

‘Lighten up: Specific postural instructions affect axial rigidity and step initiation in patients with Parkinson’s disease’ by Rajal Cohen, et al.

Instructions based on the Alexander Technique given to people with Parkinson’s Disease led to reduced postural sway, reduced axial postural tone, greater modifiability of tone, and a smoother center of pressure trajectory during step initiation, possibly indicating greater movement efficiency.[3]

See also Research into the benefits of the Alexander Technique, Research into mechanisms of the Alexander Technique.

References

[1] ‘Neck posture is influenced by anticipation of stepping’ by Rajal G. Cohen, Jason L. Baera, Anita Vasavada in Human Movement Science, vol. 64, (April 2019), pp. 108–122.
[2] ‘Preliminary evidence for feasibility, efficacy, and mechanisms of Alexander Technique group classes for chronic neck pain’ by Jordan J. Becker, Shawn L. Copeland, Emily L. Botterbusch, Rajal G. Cohen in Complementary Therapies in Medicine vol. 39 (2018) pp. 80–86.
[3] ‘Lighten Up: Specific Postural Instructions Affect Axial Rigidity and Step Initiation in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease’ by Rajal Cohen, et al. in Neural Rehabilitation and Neural Repair vol. 29, no. 9, pp. 878–88. (American Society of Neurorehabilitation, 9 February 2015).
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