COMPANION

Neck pain

Research

‘Alexander Technique Lessons or Acupuncture Sessions for Persons With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial’ by Hugh MacPherson, et al.

The conclusion of a large randomized controlled trial with 517 patients with chronic neck pain is that lessons in the Alexander Technique led to significant reductions in neck pain and associated disability. Study evaluated clinical effectiveness of Alexander Technique lessons or acupuncture versus usual care for persons with chronic, non-specific neck pain and found that both are effective.[1]

‘Preliminary evidence for feasibility, efficacy, and mechanisms of Alexander Technique group classes for chronic neck pain’ by Rajal G. Cohen, et al.

Ten participants who were predominately middle-aged and had experienced neck pain for at least six months, attended ten one-hour group classes in AT over five weeks. After the intervention: 1) participants reported significantly reduced neck pain; 2) fatigue of the superficial neck flexors during the cranio-cervical flexion test was substantially lower; 3) posture was marginally more upright, as compared to the second pre-intervention values. Changes in pain, self-efficacy, and neck muscle fatigue were retained at the second post-test and tended to be correlated with one another.[2]

See also Pain.

References

[1] ‘Alexander Technique Lessons or Acupuncture Sessions for Persons With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial’ by Hugh MacPherson, et al. in Annals of Internal Medicine vol. 163, pp. 653-662 (American College of Physicians, 2015).
[2] ‘Preliminary evidence for feasibility, efficacy, and mechanisms of Alexander Technique group classes for chronic neck pain’ by Jordan J. Becker, Shawn L. Copeland, Emily L. Botterbusch, Rajal G. Cohen in Complementary Therapies in Medicine vol. 39 (2018) pp. 80–86.