COMPANION

Lunge

Lunge is a position of mechanical advantage, and can be seen as a variation on monkey. Whereas monkey frequently consists of the feet being placed fairly symmetrically, in the lunge one foot is in front of the other, and sometimes turned more out. It is often performed for the purpose of moving forwards and backwards, hence one leg may be bent and the other straight.

According to Marjory Barlow the name ‘lunge’ was given by Patrick Macdonald as Alexander did not name it.[1]

F. M. Alexander did not write on the lunge, but he did use it in his teaching.

Descriptions

The lunge is rarely described, and most often in connection with monkey.

  • Lulie Westfeldt does not refer to the lunge, but to the importance of the ‘knee thrust’ in a position which is essentially a lunge.[2]
  • Marjory Barlow describes the lunge briefly in The Ground Rules.[3]
  • Pedro de Alcantara probably gives a more detailed description of the lunge in his Indirect Procedures.[4]
  • ‘Using the five principles’ by Avi Granit covers the lunge, among other activities.[5]

Picture: F. M. Alexander in lunge, c. 1941–42, with Deborah Caplan at the Whitney Homestead, USA. (Courtesy the Walter Carrington Educational Trust.)

Picture: F. M. Alexander in lunge, c. 1941–42. (Courtesy the Walter Carrington Educational Trust.)

See also ‘Monkey’.

References

[1] Alexander Technique: The Ground Rules by Marjory Barlow, Seán Carey (HITE, 2011), p. 111.
[2] Fig. 21 in F. Matthias Alexander: The Man and His Work by Lulie Westfeldt (Mouritz, 1998 [1964]), p. 143.
[3] Alexander Technique: The Ground Rules by Marjory Barlow, Seán Carey (HITE, 2011), pp. 111–12.
[4] Indirect Procedures by Pedro de Alcantara (Oxford UP, 1997), pp. 108–18.
[5] ‘Using the five principles’ by Avi Granit in The Congress Papers 1999, An Ongoing Discovery edited by Jean M. O. Fischer (STATBooks, 2001), pp. 206–08.