COMPANION

Distance learning

Distance learning includes correspondence courses and online (internet) teaching.

In recent years people have offered lessons or courses via the internet, also called ‘distance learning’.

Correspondence courses

There was a correspondence course available in the late 1990s, but details are not available.

Online courses

On-demand video introductory courses,[1] [2] and written material with assignments are available (e.g. The Alexander Technique Diploma Course.[3])

Online video teaching

  • Some teachers are offering individual lessons via video calls (e.g. Skype, Zoom). Arguments for this approach are given in two letters to the AmSAT Journal, ‘Skype Lessons’.[4]
  • ‘Can you teach online?’ by Paul Marsh reports on a Mio Morales workshop on online teaching which took place at the 2018 Chicago International Congress.[5]
  • ‘Can the Alexander Technique be taught on the internet?’ by Diana Devitt-Dawson, Malcolm Williamson argues for the importance of hands-on since teaching the Technique is ‘a unique experiential re-education process that cannot be taught verbally or on-line’.[6]
  • ‘Lockdown lessons: What we learned from trying teaching without touch’ by Gunda Felden reports on her own teachers training course’s experiences in adapting teaching to online teaching.[7]
  • ‘A group reflection on online teaching’ by Polly Waterfield summarises experiences from teachers of the East Anglian regional group on online teaching.[8]
  • ‘Learning to teach online’ by Penelope Easten argues that online teaching is just as valid as hands-on teaching, and that her experiences has caused her to use her hands less in in-person lessons.[9]
  • ‘Changing times: On-line teaching’ by Malcolm Williamson discusses the, with reference to ideo-motor action, and Alexander’s experiences, the difficulties of teaching people to reach a plane of ‘conscious control’ without hands-on work.[10]
  • ‘To teach online or not to teach online? That is the question!’ by Richard Brennan argues that whereas online lessons can teach additions to the Technique, they cannot teach the essence of the Technique, and online teaching will therefore remain inferior to hands-on work.[11]
  • “Necessity is the Mother of Invention: Virtual Learning: Using Your Own Hands” by N. Brooke Lieb contains six hands-on-yourself explorations.[12]
References

[4] ‘Skype Lessons’ by Robert Rickover and Leland Vall in AmSAT Journal Spring 2014, no. 5, p. 53.
[5] ‘Can you teach online?’ by Paul Marsh in STATNews vol. 10, no. 1 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, January 2019), p. 11.
[6] ‘Can the Alexander Technique be taught on the internet?’ by Diana Devitt-Dawson, Malcolm Williamson in STATNews vol. 10, no. 1 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, January 2019), pp. 25–26.
[7] ‘Lockdown lessons: What we learned from trying teaching without touch’ by Gunda Felden in STATNews vol. 10, no. 6 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, September 2020), pp. 13–15.
[8] ‘A group reflection on online teaching’ by Polly Waterfield in STATNews vol. 10, no. 6 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, September 2020), pp. 16–17.
[9] ‘Learning to teach online’ by Penelope Easten in STATNews vol. 10, no. 6 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, September 2020), pp. 30–31.
[10] ‘Changing times: On-line teaching’ by Malcolm Williamson in STATNews vol. 11, no. 1 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, January 2021), pp. 12–13.
[11] ‘To teach online or not to teach online? That is the question!’ by Richard Brennan in STATNews vol. 11, no. 1 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, January 2021), pp. 14–15.
[12] “Necessity is the Mother of Invention: Virtual Learning: Using Your Own Hands” by N. Brooke Lieb in AmSAT Journal issue no. 19 (Spring 2022), pp. 9–11.