COMPANION

Dementia

Dementia is a collective term used to describe various symptoms of cognitive decline.

Writings

  • ‘Alzheimer’s-related dementia’ by Ulli Pawlas reports on how the author works with people with dementia.[1]
  • ‘Does Alexander Technique have a role to play in dementia care?’ by Charlotte Woods relates on her experiences of caring for her mother who had dementia, how it led to her doing a pilot project with the AT at a care home and argues for the importance of the AT for carers.[2]

Research papers

‘Does Alexander Technique: A role in dementia care?’ by Charlotte Woods

A pilot study where two residents and two care workers were recruited from a care home. They attended between 11 and 14 Alexander Technique lessons over a 4–6 week period. Each lesson lasted 10–40 minutes and consisted of combined hands-on and verbal guidance from the author. The study illustrates the types of changes observed in both carers and residents after Alexander Technique lessons, and lists the ways in which the Alexander Technique is a promising intervention for both groups. In particular, positive changes were reported in pain, mobility, mood and motivation, and social interaction.[3]

References

[1] ‘Alzheimer’s-related dementia’ by Ulli Pawlas in The Congress Papers 2008, From Generation to Generation Vol. 2 edited by Jean M. O. Fischer (STATBooks, 2009), pp. 201–08.
[2] ‘Does Alexander Technique have a role to play in dementia care?’ by Charlotte Woods  in STATNews vol. 11, no. 3 edited by Jamie McDowell (STAT, September 2021), pp. 20–22.
[3] ‘Does Alexander Technique: A role in dementia care?’ by Charlotte Woods in Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 15–17.