COMPANION

Alexander Technique in non-fiction

'Ends and Means', House of Lords

Ends and Means (1937) by Aldous Huxley considers the methods (means) whereby people achieve their goals (ends), especially in religion and in society. It was published a year after Aldous Huxley started having lessons with Alexander. In Ends and Means Huxley relates social problems (of politics, of war, of economics, of education) to ethics. People don’t disagree about ends; they disagree about means. However, the means condition (or even become) the end; the end cannot be separated from the means whereby it is attained. Huxley suggests that ‘non-attachment’ is a common...
John Dewey’s Human Nature and Conduct (1922) is one of his most widely read and most widely quoted books. Alexander quotes from it in UCL, in a footnote, as follows: In his Human Nature and Conduct (pp. 27-29) Professor John Dewey discusses what happens when the ordinary man, slouching along with a stoop, is told to stand up straight. He immediately pulls himself up, and imagines that, by conforming to the idea suggested by the command, he is, for the time being, improving himself, and Professor Dewey proceeds: ‘Of course, something happens when a man acts upon his idea of...
The House of Lords, United Kingdom, has on occasion mentioned the Alexander Technique, in 1977, 1990 and 2004. The 1990 speech by Lord Richie of Dundee is a general introduction to the Technique. The following extracts are from the official records, Hansard. 1977 Lord Ferrier asked the question whether or not it is intended that a doctor of chiropractic will join Professor Cochrane's Working Group to study back pain. This turned into a debate regarding the membership of the Working Group on back pain to which Lord Hankey asked: My Lords, is it possible for other groups that are...